Systematically Assessing Safe Infant Sleep Interventions Using the Multi-Sectoral Influences Matrix (M-SIM)

This is Webinar #1 in a three-part series on safe infant sleep entitled “Systems for Safe Sleep: Purposefully Building Programs for Effective Public Health Partnerships.”

 

This series explores the topic through the lens of the Multi-Sectoral Influences Matrix (M-SIM), a tool that helps broadly scope programs and meaningfully engage the full spectrum of partners and perspectives that are affected by an intervention. The series is presented by the Southeastern and Southwestern Injury Prevention Network and the Safe States Alliance.

 

In Webinar #1, “Systematically Assessing Safe Infant Sleep Interventions Using the Multi-Sectoral Influences Matrix (M-SIM)”, participants will learn about the M-SIM, a tool developed by Dr. Carolyn Cumpsty-Fowler of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and University. The M-SIM is used for assessing feasibility, relevance, challenges and opportunities, as well as for generating stakeholder-informed question strategies that can facilitate effective and thoughtful public health program design. Dr. Fowler provides an overview of the M-SIM, Merissa Yellman of Synergy America, Inc./CDC discusses a community safe sleep program analysis using the M-SIM, and Jane Herwehe shares how the tool is being used in the Louisiana Office of Public Health/Bureau of Family Health’s safe sleep work.

 

Learning objectives

After participating in this webinar, participants will:

– Learn about the Multi-Sectoral Influences Matrix (M-SIM)

– Understand how the M-SIM can be used to assess feasibility, relevance, challenges and opportunities, and to generate stakeholder-informed question that can facilitate effective and thoughtful public health program design

– Understand how to apply the M-SIM tool to design and inform evaluation of safe sleep programs.

 

Presenters

Carolyn Cumpsty-Fowler, Johns Hopkins Hospital and University

Merissa Yellman, Synergy America, Inc./CDC’s Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention

Jane Herwehe, Louisiana Office of Public Health, Bureau of Family Health

Finding, Understanding and Using Injury and Violence Data

This is Webinar #3 in a six-part series entitled “Improving your Injury and Violence Prevention Practice with the Core Competencies.” The series is presented by the Southeastern and Southwestern Injury Prevention Network and the Safe States Alliance.

 

In this webinar series, experienced professionals in the field discuss how they use the Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention (IVP) to develop and advance their own skills, as well as those of staff they manage. The Core Competencies can provide a roadmap for gaining or strengthening the essential knowledge, skills and behaviors needed to grow professionally; develop, implement and evaluate IVP programs and policies; and strengthen the field and practice of IVP.

 

Webinar #1 provides the rational for this series, highlighting the ways the competencies can help participants in their work. Webinars #2-6 address Core Competencies for IVP #1-7, and core competencies #8-9 are addressed throughout each presentation.

 

This webinar series is relevant to those with a variety of experiences and/or years of service, including:

– Professionals working in IVP and/or other areas of public health

– Individuals anywhere along the spectrum of professional development –those new to public health and/or IVP, and those who have been working for several years and want to further develop their competencies.

 

Learning Objectives

After participating in this webinar, participants will:

– Understand IVP Core Competency #2: Ability to access, interpret, use and present injury and/or violence data.

 

– Enhance your competency in understanding and using IVP data, including:

* Overview of and how to access key injury and violence data sources

* How to develop data use agreements

* Interpreting injury and violence data – key considerations/insights

* Unique ways to present data

 

– Learn about key resources for accessing, interpreting and using injury and violence data

 

Presenters

Carol Runyan, Director, Program for Injury Prevention, Education, and Research (PIPER), Colorado School of Public Health

Scott Proescholdbell, Director, Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services

Anna Fondario, Epidemiology Manager, Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program

Consensus Recommendations for Pedestrian Injury Surveillance (ISW8)

Since 2001, the Safe States Alliance – a national professional association of injury and violence prevention professionals – has convened multidisciplinary groups of experts to recommend improvements to important injury surveillance practices. Its eighth group of experts, known as the Injury Surveillance Workgroup 8 (ISW8), were convened to develop recommendations for improving pedestrian injury surveillance efforts.

 

With support from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the ISW8 has developed a consensus report – titled Consensus Recommendations for Pedestrian Injury Surveillance – that includes 10 recommendations for improving pedestrian injury surveillance, including more comprehensive conceptual and operational definitions and strategies for enhancing pedestrian injury data collection and analysis. The report is designed to provide practitioners – particularly state traffic safety professionals and state and local public health injury prevention professionals – with recommendations for improving pedestrian injury data collection, analysis, and reporting.

 

During the webinar, participants will:
— Learn about 10 new consensus recommendations for improving pedestrian injury data collection, analysis, and reporting; and

— Obtain insights regarding methods, approaches, and data sources that can be used to enhance pedestrian injury surveillance.

 

Webinar panelists:

— Offer Grembek, PhD (ISW Chair), Co-Director at the University of California/Berkeley Safe Transportation Research and Education Center

— Michael Bauer, MS, Section Chief of Epidemiology and Surveillance at the New York State Department of Health

— Shenée Bryan, MPH, MPA, Director of Programs and Evaluation at the Research and Evaluation Group

National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) Surveillance Academy 101

The NVDRS Surveillance Academy 101 online training provides practical knowledge about the NVDRS, including an overview and history of NVDRS; data sources and data collection; how the data can be accessed; and examples of how the data may be analyzed, disseminated, and used. While the NVDRS Surveillance Academy is also held as an in-person workshop, this online training provides a condensed, on-demand version to educate, inform, and equip others with knowledge and tools to use NVDRS data.

 

Objectives for the online NVDRS Surveillance Academy 101 are to:

  • Describe violence as a public health problem, and why NVDRS is a response to this problem

 

  • Define surveillance and describe suicide and homicide surveillance activities in NVDRS
    • Types of data available for surveillance of suicide-related issues
    • Highlight data systems that collect suicide-related data
    • List characteristics of and give examples from the data systems.

 

  • Describe the history, purpose, current activities of NVDRS
    • History Overview
    • Need and Purpose
    • Current Activities

 

  • Understand NVDRS data sources and elements
    • Main types of data elements in NVDRS
    • Multiple Data Source Approach
    • How data is retrieved from multiple sources
    • Circumstance Data and Narratives

 

  • Describe how to access NVDRS data
    • Overview of the RAD
      • What it is and who can access it
      • Why to access it (for research, and what other purposes/applications/uses)
      • How to begin the RAD application process
      • What’s included in the data package
      • Collaboration with CDC Scientists and/or State Scientists

 

  • Describe generally how NVDRS data can be analyzed
    • Give an overview of NVDRS data structure
    • Provide tips on setting up an analysis with NVDRS Data

 

  • Describe WISQARS as another way to access NVDRS data
    • Why access NVDRS data via WISQARS (instead of via RAD)
    • Overview of WISQARS
    • Describe some helpful features of WISQARS

 

Presenters

  • Janet Blair, CDC/National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)
  • Alex Crosby, CDC/NCIPC
  • Katherine Fowler, CDC/NCIPC
  • Shane Jack, CDC/NCIPC
  • James Mercy, CDC/NCIPC

Self-Study Training: Injury Prevention 101

During this interactive, self-paced training, you will be introduced to key concepts, strategies, and core prevention skills essential to the practice of injury and violence prevention. This self-study training is designated for: (1) Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 4.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours, and (2) for professionals with a Certificate of Public Health (CPH) to receive 4.5 CPH Recertification Credits.

The training includes three modules with related application exercises and a webinar:

  • Module 1: “Understanding Injury”
  • Module 2: “Prevention Choices”
  • Module 3: “Evaluation & Best Practices”
  • Webinar: “Evaluation – What’s In It for You?”

 

 

Deaths Associated w/Hurricane Sandy: Oct-Nov 2012

This webinar provides information on the epidemiologic investigation of the 117 deaths associated withHurricane Sandy (2012)  It will describe the goals, methodology (using American Red Cross data), and results, including public health recommendations of the investigation. A national perspective of tracking deaths associated with disasters will also be presented.

 

Webinar Goals:

  1. Learn about the deaths associated with Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
  2. Learn about how hurricane-related drowning deaths in evacuation zones are preventable.
  3. Learn about the accuracy of American Red Cross fatality data from New York City’s perspective
  4. Learn about the CDC national perspective on disaster epidemiology.
  5. Raise the visibility and level of dialogue about disaster epidemiology within the larger community of injury prevention programs at the state, territorial, and local levels.

 

Presenters/Participants:

  • Michelle Murti, MD, Fraser Health Authority, British Columbia;
  • Renata Howland, MPH, CSTE/CDC Applied Epidemiology Fellow, New York City Department of Health;
  • Amy F. Wolkin, MSPH, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, CDC;
  • Rebecca S. Noe, MPH, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, CDC; and
  • Jeanne Spears, RN, Volunteer Partner, Disaster Health Services, American Red Cross.

 

This webinar is sponsored by the Safe States Disaster Epidemiology Special Interest Group. This is the self-directed group with projects and activities decided by the members.

Core VIPP Year 4 State Injury Indicators and Special Emphasis Report Tools

This webinar was conducted in conjunction with the release of the Core VIPP Year 4 Injury Indicator and Special Emphasis Report tools. The webinar:

(1) Provides an overview of updates and changes to this year’s Indicators;

(2) Introduces a new quality assurance tool;

(3) Reviews the components that were distributed with each of the Special Emphasis Reports; and

(4) Provides a time for questions and answers.

 

Injury Indicators

State Injury Indicators Data Collection Guidance Document

State Injury Indicator Spreadsheets (Death, Hospitalization, ED)

 

Traumatic Brain Injury

Special Emphasis Report on Traumatic Brain Injury Guidance Document

Special Emphasis Report on Traumatic Brain Injury Report Templates

Traumatic Brain Injury Spreadsheets

 

Infant and Early Childhood Injury

Special Emphasis Report on Infant and Early Childhood Injury Guidance Document

Special Emphasis Report on Infant and Early Childhood Injury Report Templates

 

The webinar was presented by Renee Johnson, RPT, MSPH, Epidemiologist with CDC/NCIPC/DARPI; and Karen Thomas, MPH, Data Manager with CDC/NCIPC/DARPI. _ The webinar was moderated by Karen Ledford, Program Consultant with the CDC NCIPC Core VIPP Team of DARPI.

Injury Outbreak Investigation In A Rural Texas City: Innovative Approaches & Lessons Learned

Local, regional, and state public health officials conducted an injury outbreak investigation following a massive fertilizer plant explosion that occurred in a rural community in Texas in April 2013. The explosion killed 15 individuals and injured over 250 individuals in the community.

 

In this webinar, epidemiologists will describe their approach in designing this investigation and identifying data sources. They will describe the characteristics of the nonfatal and fatal injuries (including an injury pyramid), the factors contributing to those injuries, and the location of the injured persons at the time of the blast (including injury maps). Innovative approaches and lessons learned will be discussed that will benefit local, state, and territorial injury programs.

 

At the end of this webinar, viewers will be able to:

1.) Identify the types of injuries to expect following a fertilizer plant explosion

2.) Identify factors contributing to those injuries

3.) Identify the unique challenges related to conducting an injury investigation

4.) Identify innovative approaches and lessons learned

5.) Participate in a dialogue about disaster epidemiology within the larger community of injury prevention programs at the state, territorial, and local levels.

 

The webinar was moderated by David Zane, Epidemiologist, from the Texas Department of State Health Services, and included presentations from Kahler Stone, Waco-McLennan County Public Health District; Hammad Akram, Waco-McLennan County Public Health District; and Bonnie Feldt, Texas Department of State Health Services.

Results of the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) to the 2014 South Napa (California) Earthquake

On August 24, 2014, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck in Napa County, California. Local and state public health officials responded, which included conducting a community public health assessment in the affected community. During this webinar, local and state public health officials from California will present information on that assessment, including a focus on injuries, chronic disease exacerbation, mental health, household property damage, and emergency preparedness.

 

Learning objectives of webinar:

1. To describe the objectives of the community public health assessment.

2. To describe how the assessment was planned and conducted.

3. To describe community needs and injuries following an earthquake.

 

Presenters: Jennifer Henn, PhD, Epidemiologist with Napa County Public Health Svetlana Smorodinsky , MPH, Research Scientist with California Department of Public Health Kathleen Attfield, ScD, CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with California Department of Public Health Christine Dobson, ScD CDC/CSTE Applied Epidemiology Fellow with California Department of Public Health The webinar was moderated by David Zane, Epidemiologist, Texas Department of State Health Services.

 

This webinar was sponsored by the Disaster Epidemiology Special Interest Group. This is the self-directed group with projects and activities decided by the members. This group provides a forum for Safe States members with an interest in disaster epidemiology to:

* Express ideas

* Learn best practices

* Contribute to expert discussions with peers and colleaguess

* Stay informed about current developments

* Build a network of professional contacts in the field.

Using & Understanding Suicide Data from NVDRS

More than 38,000 people died from suicide in the United States in 2010. In any given year there are generally a third more suicides than homicides yet public perspective and media attention makes it seem that there are far more homicides. Combined with ongoing stigma, suicide deaths appear to be far removed from spotlight. Data from NVDRS has helped to turn the tide. Created in 2002, the NVDRS is a surveillance system currently in 18 states that collects data on violent deaths including details about the circumstances of the deaths. The system includes information about child maltreatment (or child abuse) fatalities, intimate partner homicides, all other homicides, suicides, deaths where individuals are killed by law enforcement in the line of duty, unintentional firearm injury deaths, and deaths of undetermined intent.

 

This webinar presents:

— An overview of the CDC NVDRS suicide prevention research

— State examples of using VDRS suicide data and creating partnerships

— An example of academic and community partners using NVDRS suicide data.

 

Presentation by Alex Crosby, CDC NVDRS Presentation by Deborah Hull-Jilly, Alaska VDRS Program Presentation by Sheryl Brown, Oklahoma VDRS Program Presentation by Robert Bossuarte, Injury Control Research Center on Suicide (University of Rochester) The webinar was moderated by Paul Bonta, National Violence Prevention Network, American College of Preventive Medicine. The NVDRS Special Interest Group is chaired by Scott Proescholdbell (North Carolina VDRS) and serves as a forum for people and partners interested in using NVDRS to prevent violent deaths.

Preparing for Core Funding Series: Epidemiology and Surveillance Capacity

The webinar series Preparing for Core Funding, will identify and address questions of states interested in applying for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) funding (2016) to support core activities of state health department injury prevention programs.

 

The goals of the series include:

* Provide a venue for peer-to-peer information sharing

* Provide information on the elements needed to be a successful state injury prevention program

* Provide information and tools that can help build any needed capacity in advance of the funding announcement’s release

* Respond to evolving needs of the injury prevention community as new information comes to light about the funding announcement.

 

The five webinars in the series are: * Webinar 1: Overview of the Core Program: Getting Familiar with the Basics * Webinar 2: Building Capacity Before you Have Funding * Webinar 3: Epidemiology and Surveillance Capacity * Webinar 4: State Plans and Injury Community Planning Groups * Webinar 5: Evaluation for Impact